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The Texas Water Development Board distributes Turn Around Don't Drown® signs Posted on August 09, 2021

Transcript

Yi Chan - National Flood Insurance Program State Coordinator and Community Assistance Program Manager, Texas Water Development Board

"One of the functions of the Texas Water Development Board is to serve as the state coordinating office for the National Flood Insurance Program. As a part of that, we work really closely to provide outreach and assistance to local officials to help them with their floodplain management programs. And part of that outreach includes these signs, which we purchased in collaboration with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. If you're interested in obtaining a sign, we work closely with local communities to get them to them. So local officials can contact us at flood@twdb.texas.gov. We'll work with them to decide, you know, which cross streets might need those signs, and we'll coordinate on dropping the signs off and getting them to them."

Additional Soundbites

Helping communities with their flood outreach

Yi Chan - National Flood Insurance Program State Coordinator and Community Assistance Program Manager, Texas Water Development Board

"The Texas Water Development Board's Community Assistance Program works closely with local communities to get the Turn Around Don't Drown® signs distributed and installed. We provide these signs to communities who are in need to help with their flood outreach, to let people know that these are low-water crossings where people might be at risk for driving into floodwaters when it does rain."

Drivers should not risk driving on flooded roads

Yi Chan - National Flood Insurance Program State Coordinator and Community Assistance Program Manager, Texas Water Development Board

"It's important for drivers to know that it only can take a foot of water to float an average-sized vehicle, and two feet of water will carry away most vehicles, including larger SUVs and trucks. So those that are in the community know what's going on there best. They know where it tends to flood. It's typically roads that have a dip or a V. There's not always a creek that's running across it at all times, or even on either side of the road. When flash flooding happens, an area can get flooded very, very quickly. So, in general, you should just avoid those flooded waters."

This article is posted in Flood .